Start Dating violence in adolescents

Dating violence in adolescents

Understanding Teen Dating Violence (PDF) This concise fact sheet developed by the CDC helps explain: Why is dating violence a public health problem? Dating Violence Prevention, Teens Ages 13 to 19 Years The New York State Department of Health provides an overview and links to state and national resources.

Preventing teen dating violence starts with awareness. Or that out of every three young people, one has been a victim of physical, sexual, emotional, or verbal abuse from someone they are dating?

[2] Experiencing such violence so early in life can have long-term detrimental impacts on adolescents: victims are at higher risk for substance abuse, eating disorders, risky sexual behavior, and attempted or considered suicide.

In one study, only 44 percent of female and 32 percent of male adolescent victims, and 17 percent of female and 33 percent of male adolescent perpetrators sought help.9 When adolescents did seek help, whether perpetrators or victims, they most often disclosed the abuse to peers, with only one third confiding in parents.59 Data show that parents and physicians are not inquiring about this issue as they do about other behaviors, such as sexual activity and drug use.

A lack of knowledge and outcomes evidence contributes to the fact that health care professionals are missing the chance to identify and intervene in one of the more common and serious health problems faced by adolescents.512It is important that family physicians be aware of the possibility of dating violence among adolescents and be able to provide a supportive environment in which adolescents may feel comfortable disclosing issues of relationship violence.

In other words, we talk about the violence facing our community from those outside it, from those who are openly homophobic and transphobic, but what about the violence happening within our community?

As difficult as it may be to admit, LGBTQ people – including LGBTQ youth – can be and are perpetrators of violence as well as its victims, and too often, that violence occurs in the context of romantic and/or sexual relationships.

The rates of sexual victimization for LGB respondents was 23.2 percent, nearly double that of heterosexual youth, of whom 12.3 percent reported sexual coercion.

Relationship and dating violence is a significant problem among adolescents and young adults.

Further studies, which follow participants for a longer period of time and which look at the relationship between attitudes, knowledge, behaviour, skills and the number of times relationship violence occurs, are required to improve our understanding of how well these programmes work.

of interventions on episodes of relationship violence or on attitudes, behaviours and skills related to relationship violence.

Adolescent girls generally suffer more serious and more lasting effects than adolescent boys, though perpetrators come from both genders.